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The Better Angels of our Nature (Allen Lane)

The Better Angels of our Nature (Allen Lane)

Contrary to popular belief, humankind has become progressively less violent, over millennia and decades. Can violence really have declined? The images of conflict we see daily on our screens from around the world suggest this is an almost obscene claim to be making. Extraordinarily, however, Steven Pinker shows violence within and between societies - both murder and warfare - really has declined from prehistory to today. Debunking both the idea of the 'noble savage' and an over-simplistic Hobbesian notion of a  'nasty, brutish and short' life, Steven Pinker argues that modernity and its cultural institutions are actually making us better people.

About the Author

Steven Pinker

Steven Pinker is the Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. Until 2003, he taught in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. He conducts research on language and cognition, writes for publications such as The New York Times, Time and Slate, and is the author of six books, including The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate and The Stuff of Thought.

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